Ch'ang Hon Taekwon-Do

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Step-sparring is a critical training tool in the development of both timing and distance judgment for traditional Taekwon-Do techniques.  This training will eventually lead the student to a confident execution of these techniques in free sparring.  The various Types of Step Sparring are listed below the rank promotion requirements.

 

Below are links to web pages for the individual Chang Hon Kwan step-sparring requirements for belt rank promotion.  To view a list of the requirements for promotion to a particular belt rank, click on that rank as indicated below.

 

Also liste at the end of this page are Special Notes to be taken into account during Step Sparring practice, as well as notes on Distance Measurement in various stances.

 

An additional testing requirement for students testing for 5th Geup High Green Belt through 2nd Dan Black Belt will include No-Contact Free-Sparring against a single opponent.

 

 

For Promotion  
to the rank of:
Belt Level
    Requirements

9th Geup  

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8th Geup  

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7th Geup   

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6th Geup   

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6th Geup   

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5th Geup   

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4th Geup   

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4th Geup   

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3rd Geup   

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3rd Geup   

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2nd Geup   

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2nd Geup   

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1st Geup   

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1st Geup   

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1st Dan  

1st Dan  

2nd Dan  

2nd Dan  

2nd Dan  

3rd Dan  

3rd Dan  

4th Dan  

5th Dan  

No New Step-Sparring Requirements

6th Dan  

No New Step-Sparring Requirements

7th Dan  

No New Step-Sparring Requirements

     

Types of Step Sparring

 

Three Step Sparring

     Three-Step Sparring is the initial basic sparring exercise among beginners usually from the 9th Geup thru 6th Geup.  This is an exercise for familiarization of correct attack and defense techniques utilizing mainly hands against middle and high targets, and the feet against low targets while stepping forward and backward.  There are two methods of practice; One-Way, and Two-Way.  Both of them can be practiced either alone or with companion.

• One-Way Three-Step Sparring - The attack is executed only while stepping forward, and defense while stepping backward.

• Two-Way Three-Step Sparring - Both attacks and defenses are executed while stepping both forward and backward. 

 

Two-Step Sparring

      The main purpose of Two-Step Sparing is to help the student acquire a working knowledge of attacking with hands and feet alternately.  It is however, entirely optional whether the attacker uses the hand or foot first.  As in the case of Three-Step Sparring there are two methods of practice; One-Way and Two-Way.

• One-Way Two-Step Sparring - The attack is executed only while stepping forward and the defense while stepping backward.

• Two-Way Two-Step Sparring - Both attacks and defenses are executed while stepping both forward and backward. 

 

One-Step Sparring

      One Step-Sparring is considered to be the most important form of step sparring, since the ultimate goal of Taekwon-Do is to win in a real combat situation with a single punching or kicking technique.  The goal of this sparring format is therefore, to deliver a fast, accurate, and decisive blow at the opponent’s vital spot with an appropriate tool, while defending against the opponent’s attack.

      The student should be ready to use all possible techniques available for both, attack, defense, and counter-attacks including the use of flying and dodging techniques with both the feet and hands.

 

Semi-Free Step-Sparring:

      Semi-Free Step-Sparring is the last stage before the student enters into free sparring, though free-sparring can be exercised at all levels as well.

      The distance between the players as well as the method of attack and defense, the attacking and blocking tools used, and the number of steps to be taken are completely optional.  However, only one series of attacking and defensive motions are exchanged.

 

Free Sparring:

      Free-Sparring is essentially an open combat format with controlled attacking/blocking/counter-attacking, and having no prearranged method between the partners.  In Free-Sparring; accurate attacks, skillful dodging, speed, power, balance, strong and accurate blocking, as well as spirit are important.

 

Model Sparring:

      The purpose of this step-sparring is to show the spectators the agility and skill of the defender as well as the physical application of every single movement used.  This is accomplished by first using regular speed techniques, and then repeating the movements in a slow motion.  The goal of the attacker in the demonstration is to provide a precise target upon which the demonstrator can apply techniques.  The distance between the attacker and defender can be freely adjusted, with the attacker executing only one prearranged technique.

 

Pre-Arranged Step-Sparring:

      Pre-Arranged Step Sparring is a controlled, simulated format of Free-Sparring.  That is, the participants follow a prepared scenario in which each partner skillfully exhibits a wide variety of techniques without fear or injury.  Pre-Arranged Step Sparring is visually impressive and useful for introducing the Taekwon-Do style of fighting to an audience.  Making Pre-Arranged the perfect step-sparring format for demonstrations.  It is practiced as the name denotes, under prearranged agreements.  For example, the number of steps to be taken, the targets to be attacked, and the attacking tools to be used are pre-arranged between the partners.

 

Foot Technique Step-Sparring

      Foot Technique Step-Sparring is a unique form of sparring developed from the ancient Korean art of “Tae-Kyeon” and “Su-Bak-Gi” which mainly relied on the feet.  The significance of this sparring format is to symbolize these ancient Korean martial arts, and promote the kicking techniques required in Taekwon-Do.  Since both attack and defense are performed with the feet, hand techniques are not allowed in this particular sparring format.  Both partners are completely free to exchange attack and defense motions with no prearranged mode except for the initial movement of the attacker.

 


Special Notes

 

General:

Step sparring is not intended for the attacker to show off.  The emphasis should be placed on the defender’s performance.

Students are expected to make firm contact on any block, but attacks or counter-attacks should be impact free.  Students are expected to demonstrate good power and speed while also demonstrating good control by performing their techniques as close as possible to their partner without making any contact, except where noted in the instructions for each type of step sparring.

Step sparring should be performed in a formal manner and the partners should demonstrate good courtesy.

It is important that students demonstrate good stances when performing step sparring.  This will demonstrate the students understanding of correct stance characteristics and distances.

It is important that students perform all blocks and attacks to the proper target and with the correct tool.  This will demonstrate the students understanding of which tools are appropriate for different targets.

Students should not be in a hurry when performing Step-Sparring routines. 

Students will be familiar with Taekwon-Do terminology to ensure that giving and receiving instructions for Step-Sparring routines proceeds smoothly and quickly.  Instructions given to Step-Sparring partners will be easily understood and technically correct.

 

Attention Positions and Bowing:

   All Step Sparring:

     A Step-Sparring demonstration begins with the partners stepping into an Attention Stance and bowing to each other.  The bow will be a 15o bend at the waist and the partners will maintain eye contact with each other throughout the bow.  The junior partner will not begin to rise from their bow until the senior partner has begun to rise from their bow.

 

Ready Positions:

All Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot.  The defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their left foot.

   The junior partner will not begin to step into their ready position until the senior partner has begun to step into their ready position. 

Three-Step Sparring:

  The attacker’s ready position depends upon which stance the defender wants them to attack from.

  At the end of the routine, if the distance between the partners needs to be re-adjusted, then the new attacker will step into an Attention Stance to signal the new defender that it is necessary to re-measure the distance.  The new defender will step into an Attention Stance and the new attacker will re-measure the distance.

Two-Step Sparring:

  The defender may choose which ready position to use.

  At the end of the routine, if the distance between the partners needs to be re-adjusted, then the new attacker will step into an Attention Stance to signal the new defender that it is necessary to re-measure the distance.  The new defender will step into an Attention Stance and the new attacker will re-measure the distance.

One-Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot if their attack is a hand technique.

  The attacker will step back into an L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm if their attack is a foot technique.

Model Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot if their attack is a hand technique. 

  The attacker will step back into an L-Stance if their attack is a foot technique.

Pre-Arranged Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot.  The defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their left foot.

  The attacker will step back into a L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and ki-ap to signal that they are ready to begin attack.

  The defender will step back into a L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and will not ki-ap.

  The attacker and defender will step into their positions simultaneously.

Foot Technique Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot.  The defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their left foot.

  The attacker and defender will step into their ready positions simultaneously.

  The attacker will step back into L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and ki-ap to signal that they are ready to begin attack.

  The defender will step back into L-Stance executing middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and will not ki-ap.

 

Stepping:

Three-Step Sparring:

  If the attacker uses Walking Stances and the defender uses Walking Stances, then the attacker will step to the outside of the defender’s lead foot, then to the inside, and then to the outside.

  If the attacker uses L-Stances and the defender uses L-Stances, then the attacker will step to the inside of the defender’s lead foot, then to the outside, and then to the inside. 

  If the attacker uses Walking Stances and the defender uses L-Stances, then the attacker will step to the outside of the defender’s lead foot all three times.

  If the attacker uses L-Stances and the defender uses Walking Stances, then the attacker will step to the inside of defender’s lead foot all three times.

  The attacker must step to the same spot from which they measured for their first attack.

 

Attacks:

All Step Sparring:

   For simplicity "…step forward into…" and "…step backward into…" have been used to describe the motion of attacks and defenses, however for higher rank Step-Sparring routines jumping techniques, dodging techniques, skipping techniques, and sliding techniques are also permitted. 

Three-Step Sparring:

   The three attacks will be the same hand technique or foot technique and will be from the same stance.

Two-Step Sparring:

   The two attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

One-Step Sparring:

   The attacks for each routine will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques.

Semi-Free Step Sparring:

   The attacker’s attack will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques.

Model Sparring:

   The attacks for each routine will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques.

Pre-Arranged Step Sparring:

   The attacks for each routine will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques. 

Foot Technique Step Sparring:

   All attacks will be foot techniques.

 

Counter Attacks:

All Step Sparring:

   If the last counter attack is a foot technique, then the defender will step forward into an L-Stance with the kicking leg before continuing on to the ready position.

 Three-Step Sparring:

   Alone and Beginning: One counter-attack will be used.

   Intermediate: Two counterattacks will be used.  The counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

   Advanced: Three counter-attacks will be used.  The first two counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique and the third counter-attack maybe either a hand technique or a foot technique.

Two Step-Sparring:

  Double or consecutive foot techniques are allowed, and the defender may use a defensive foot technique and counter-attack with an offensive foot technique. 

   Beginning: One counter-attack will be used.

   Intermediate: Two counter-attacks will be used.  The counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

   Two-Way Two-Step: Three counter-attacks will be used.  These counter-attacks may consist of mixture of both hand and foot attack combinations. (i.e., hand-foot-hand, foot-hand-foot, hand-foot-foot, foot-foot-hand, or hand-hand-foot, etc.)

One-Step Sparring:

  Double, triple or consecutive foot techniques are allowed and the defender may use a defensive foot technique and counter-attack with an offensive foot technique.

   Beginning: One counter-attack will be used.

   Intermediate: Two counter-attacks will be used.  The counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

   Advanced: Multiple counterattacks are to be used, but the number of counter-attacks should not be excessive.  The counter-attacks may consist of any combination, consecutive, or multiple hand techniques and foot techniques however Advanced One-Step Sparring is designed for the defender to demonstrate their kicking abilities, so no more than one hand technique should be used in each routine.

Semi-Free Step Sparring:

  The defender will counter-attack with the same type of technique that the initial attacker used last.  (i.e.  A foot technique for a foot technique, a hand technique for a hand technique, a flying technique for a flying technique, a skipping technique for a skipping technique, a sliding technique for a sliding technique, etc.)

Model Step-Sparring:

  Multiple counter-attacks are to be used, but the number of counter-attacks should not be excessive.  The counter-attacks may consist of any combination, consecutive, or multiple hand techniques and foot techniques however Model Sparring is designed for the student to demonstrate their kicking ability with high target kicking, posed kicking, and difficult combination and consecutive kicking.  An ideal counter-attack for Model Sparring would be one hand technique and up to three foot techniques. No jumping, flying or mid-air kicks are allowed.

Pre-Arranged Step-Sparring:

  Multiple counter-attacks may be used however the final ideal counter-attack for a Pre-Arranged Free-Sparring routine would be one powerful hand technique or foot technique.

Foot Technique Step Sparring:

  Multiple counter-attacks may be used however an ideal counter-attack for a Foot Technique Sparring routine would be one powerful hand technique or foot technique.

 

Dodging Techniques:

  Dodging allows the attacker to use any technique freely at the proper distance, and increases the opportunity of targets.  The added advantage of this technique is not only to avoid collision at a close distance, but to allow a surprise attack while flying away from the opponent.  With technique alone, Taekwon-Do can be clearly differentiated from any other existing martial art.

 

Flying Multiple Techniques:

  A student of Taekwon-Do is encouraged to use as many multiple techniques as possible, such as; consecutive, combination or double kicks, punches or strikes.  These types of techniques are principally used while flying - though occasionally on the ground.

 

 

Distance Measurement
 

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Measuring in Walking Stance – Toes to middle of foot:

      First Scenario

         Attacker: Middle attacks from Walking Stance

         Defender: Half-facing Forearm Blocks from Walking Stance or L-Stance


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      Second Scenario

         Attacker: High attacks from Walking Stance

         Defender: Half-facing Knife-Hand Blocks from

                               Walking Stance or L-Stance

 

 

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Measuring in Walking Stance – Toes to ball of foot:

 

         Attacker: Middle attacks from Walking Stance

         Defender: Half-facing Knife-Hand Blocks from

                               Walking Stance or L-Stance

 

 

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Measuring in Walking Stance – Back heel to back heel:

         Attacker: Overhead attacks from Walking Stance

         Defender: Rising Blocks from Walking Stance or L-Stance

 

 

 

 

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Measuring in Walking Stance – Toes to back heel:

         Attacker: High attacks from Walking Stance

         Defender: Half-facing Forearm Blocks from Walking Stance or L-Stance

 

 

 

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Measuring in L-Stance – Toes to middle of feet:

         Attacker: Attacks from L-Stance

         Defender: Blocks from L-Stance

         Note: This is the only type of measuring used in

                               Two-Step Sparring.