Ch'ang Hon Taekwon-Do

model_sparring.gif

Model Step Sparring

 
The purpose of this step-sparring is to show the spectators the agility and skill of the defender as well as the physical application of every single movement used.  This is accomplished by first using regular speed techniques, and then repeating the movements in a slow motion.  The goal of the attacker in the demonstration is to provide a precise target upon which the demonstrator can apply techniques.  The distance between the attacker and defender can be freely adjusted, with the attacker executing only one prearranged technique.
 
Model Sparring is the required Step-Sparring format for promotion when testing for 2nd Dan, Black Belt.  It should begin with a simple bow to your partner.  The bow should be at 15o, while looking at your partner's eyes.  The junior student should come up from the bow after their senior.  All routines are to be performed in a formal manner with a high degree of discipline.  When performing this level of step-sparring the student should keep the following points in mind:
 

• Distance is still very important, however measurement is not allowed for Model Step-Sparring.  At this level of step-sparring the student should already have a good understanding of the concept of distance.  Also, both partners should make sure to use proper stances and correct distance so that they do not injure each other.

• Model Sparring is designed for the student to show case his/her high, "posed" kicks as well as difficult combination and consecutive kicking combinations.

• The routines will first be performed at regular speed and then in slow motion.

• It is important that the student demonstrate General Choi's idea that any of the techniques used are capable of ending a conflict with "one kick or one punch".

• Students should be familiar with all terminology to ensure that the Step-Sparring routines proceed smoothly and there are no delays.

• Instructions given to sparring partners should be simple, clear, easily understood, and technically correct.

• It is important that the defender use correct stances, and that all blocks are executed properly and with the appropriate tools.

• It is important that the student ensure that all attacks and counter-attacks use appropriate tools and are directed at suitable vital spots. 

• The students should not rush or be in a hurry to complete their routines.

• An appropriate block, attack, or counter-attack is a technique that is taught to the student at their belt level or a technique that is in one of the patterns up through their testing patterns. 

 

Number and Type of Counter-Attacks:        

     In Model Step Sparring multiple counter-attacks are to be used.  These counter-attacks may only consist of techniques that are taught to the student at their belt level, to include required kicks, as well as all techniques used in patterns up through their testing patterns.  These are patterns Gwang-Gae, Po-Eun, and Gye-Baek if the student is testing for 2nd Dan, Black Belt. 

Explanation of Step-Sparring Format:                                 

     Both the attacker and the defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance, with the attacker stepping to the right and the defender stepping to the left.  The defender will tell the attacker what stance to start the attack from and what attack is to be executed by the attacker.  This attack will consist of either a single foot or a single hand attack.

Distance Measuring:

     Distance measurement is not allowed for Model Step-Sparring, since student at this level should already have a good understanding of the concept of distance. 

 

Preparatory Move:         

     Both the attacker and the defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance, with the attacker stepping to the right and the defender stepping to the left.  The defender will tell the attacker which techniques to perform, as well as which Stance to start from.

     If the attacker is to attack with a hand technique first, then he/she will start from a Parallel Ready Stance.  In this case, the attacker must ki-ap to signal his/her readiness to begin. 

     If the attacker is to attack with a kick first, then he/she will step back with his/her foot into the appropriate L-Stance and execute a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm.  The attacker must ki-ap at the same time as he/she executes the Guarding Block.

Next Move:                       

     The defender has the choice to start from either a Parallel Ready Stance, or an L-Stance.  At the same time that the attacker steps back into his/her preparatory stance, the defender moves into his/her chosen beginning stance.  The defender must then ki-ap to signal his/her readiness to begin.

Fast Attack and Block:                         

     The attacker executes the prearranged attack and the defender executes an appropriate level defensive technique.  The blocking technique should only result in light contact.

Fast Counter-Attacks:  

     The defender executes multiple appropriate counter-attacks (primarily foot techniques).  The defender may move into another appropriate stance prior to, during, or at the end of the counter-attacking motions.  After the last counter-attack, the defender will step back with his/her front foot into a L-Stance; execute a middle Guarding Block, and ki-ap.  However, if the last counter-attack is a kick, the defender will first step down with the kicking leg into an appropriate stance, then move his/her front foot back into an L-Stance, execute a middle Guarding Block, and ki-ap.  There is no need for the defender to attempt to have their counter-attacks make more than light contact with the attacker.

Return to Ready Position:       

     Both the attacker and the defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance, with the attacker stepping backward and the defender stepping forward.  The attacker returns to a ready position after the defender has initiated a movement to return to the A-B line into a ready position.  The defender must then ki-ap to signal his/her readiness to begin.

Slow Attack and Block:  

     The attacker executes the same attack as used previously in the "Fast Attack" but executes it is a slow motion technique. 

Slow Counter-Attacks:

     The defender executes the same multiple appropriate counter-attacks as used previously in the "Fast Counter-Attacks" but executed as slow motion techniques.  After the last counter-attack, the defender will step back with his/her front foot into an L-Stance, executes a middle Guarding Block, and will simultaneously ki-ap.  However, if the counter-attack is a kick, the defender will first step down with the kicking leg into an appropriate stance, then move his/her front foot back into an L-Stance, execute a middle Guarding Block, and will simultaneously ki-ap.

Return to Ready Position:       

     Both the attacker and the defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance, with the attacker stepping backward and the defender stepping forward.  The attacker returns to a ready position after the defender has initiated a movement to return to the A-B line into a ready position. 

 

PRE-ARRANGED STEP-SPARRING – 3rd DAN BLACK BELT

 

Pre-Arranged Step Sparring

 

Pre-Arranged Step-Sparring is the required Step-Sparring format for promotion when test for 3rd Dan, Black Belt.  It should begin with a simple bow to your partner.  The bow should be 15o, while looking at your partners eyes.  The junior should come up from the bow after the senior. All routines are to be performed in a formal matter with a high degree of discipline.  When performing this level of step-sparring you should keep the following points in mind. 

 

• Distance is still very important, however measurement is not allowed for Pre-Arranged Step-Sparring.  At this level of step-sparring the student should already have a good understanding of the concept of distance.  Also, both partners should make sure to use proper stances and correct distance so that they do not injure each other.

• Pre-Arranged Step-Sparring is designed for the student to show attacks and blocks used in a formal manner and techniques that are not widely used in free sparring.  Although the pace is fast, it should not resemble free sparring.

• The students have a chance to be original and to show proper applications of some of the lesser used techniques.

• It is important that the student demonstrate General Choi's idea that any of the techniques used are capable of ending a conflict with "one kick or one punch".

• Students should be familiar with all terminology to ensure that the Step-Sparring routines proceed smoothly and there are no delays.

• Instructions given to sparring partners should be simple, clear, easily understood, and technically correct.

• It is important that the defender use correct stances, and that all blocks are executed properly and with the appropriate tools.

• It is important that the student ensure that all attacks and counter-attacks use appropriate tools and are directed at suitable vital spots. 

• The students should not rush or be in a hurry to complete their routines.

• An appropriate block, attack, or counter-attack is a technique that is taught to the student at their belt level or a technique that is in one of the patterns up through their testing patterns. 

 

Number and Type of Attacks and Counter-Attacks:

      Pre-Arranged Step Sparring is similar in format to Advanced Semi-Free Step Sparring in that singular attacks and defensive techniques are executed sequentially by each participant, alternating back and forth.  These techniques are pre-arranged and should therefore flow smoother and faster than Semi-Free Step Sparring.  The attacks and counter-attacks may only consist of techniques that are taught to the student at their belt level. 

 

Routines:

      Students should have at least five routines prepared for demonstration.  Each routine should consist of three to five attacking/blocking/counter-attacking interactions executed by both participants, with the original defender winning.

 


Explanation of Step-Sparring Format:

      The attacker and defender will step into an Attention Stance and bow to each other.  Both the attacker and the defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance, with the attacker stepping to the right and the defender stepping to the left.  The defender will tell the attacker what stance to start the attack from and what attack is to be executed by the attacker.  This attack will consist of either a single foot or a single hand attack. 

 

Distance Measuring:     

      Distance measurement is not allowed for Pre-Arranged Step Sparring, since student at this level should already have a good understanding of the concept of distance. 

 

Preparatory Move:         

      The attacker and defender will step into their Junbi positions simultaneously.  The attacker will step backward into an L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and ki-ap to signal that they are ready to begin attacking.  The defender will step backward into an L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm.  (The defender does not ki-ap.)

 

Attacks and Blocks:

      The attacker executes the prearranged attack and the defender executes an appropriate level defensive technique.  Blocking techniques should make firm contact with the correct part of the attacker's attacking hand or foot.

 

Counter Attacks:

      As the winner, the defender can execute either multiple appropriate counter-attacks or one decisive counter-attack.  The defender may move into another appropriate stance prior to, during, or at the end of the counter-attacking motions.  There is no need for the defender to attempt to have their counter-attacks make more than firm contact with the attacker.

 

Next Move:                       

      After the last counter-attack, the defender will step back with his/her front foot into an L-Stance, executes a middle Guarding Block, and will simultaneously ki-ap.  However, if the last counter-attack is a kick, the defender will first step down with the kicking leg into an appropriate stance, then move his/her front foot back into an L-Stance, execute a middle Guarding Block, and simultaneously ki-ap. 

 

Return to Ready Position:

      Both attacker and defender step into a Parallel Ready Stance, with the attacker stepping backward and the defender stepping forward.  The attacker returns to a ready position after the defender has initiated a movement to return to the A-B line into a ready position.

 

Remaining Routines:

      The remaining routines will begin from Parallel Ready Stances, and continue in the format previously detailed until the student has finished his/her demonstration.

 

SPECIAL NOTES:

General:

Step sparring is not intended for the attacker to show off.  The emphasis should be placed on the defender’s performance.

Students are expected to make firm contact on any block, but attacks or counter-attacks should be impact free.  Students are expected to demonstrate good power and speed while also demonstrating good control by performing their techniques as close as possible to their partner without making any contact, except where noted in the instructions for each type of step sparring.

Step sparring should be performed in a formal manner and the partners should demonstrate good courtesy.

It is important that students demonstrate good stances when performing step sparring.  This will demonstrate the students understanding of correct stance characteristics and distances.

It is important that students perform all blocks and attacks to the proper target and with the correct tool.  This will demonstrate the students understanding of which tools are appropriate for different targets.

Students should not be in a hurry when performing Step-Sparring routines. 

Students will be familiar with Taekwon-Do terminology to ensure that giving and receiving instructions for Step-Sparring routines proceeds smoothly and quickly.  Instructions given to Step-Sparring partners will be easily understood and technically correct.

 

Attention Positions and Bowing:

   All Step Sparring:

     A Step-Sparring demonstration begins with the partners stepping into an Attention Stance and bowing to each other.  The bow will be a 15o bend at the waist and the partners will maintain eye contact with each other throughout the bow.  The junior partner will not begin to rise from their bow until the senior partner has begun to rise from their bow.

 

Ready Positions:

All Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot.  The defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their left foot.

   The junior partner will not begin to step into their ready position until the senior partner has begun to step into their ready position. 

Three-Step Sparring:

  The attacker’s ready position depends upon which stance the defender wants them to attack from.

  At the end of the routine, if the distance between the partners needs to be re-adjusted, then the new attacker will step into an Attention Stance to signal the new defender that it is necessary to re-measure the distance.  The new defender will step into an Attention Stance and the new attacker will re-measure the distance.

Two-Step Sparring:

  The defender may choose which ready position to use.

  At the end of the routine, if the distance between the partners needs to be re-adjusted, then the new attacker will step into an Attention Stance to signal the new defender that it is necessary to re-measure the distance.  The new defender will step into an Attention Stance and the new attacker will re-measure the distance.

One-Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot if their attack is a hand technique.

  The attacker will step back into an L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm if their attack is a foot technique.

Model Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot if their attack is a hand technique. 

  The attacker will step back into an L-Stance if their attack is a foot technique.

Pre-Arranged Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot.  The defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their left foot.

  The attacker will step back into a L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and ki-ap to signal that they are ready to begin attack.

  The defender will step back into a L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and will not ki-ap.

  The attacker and defender will step into their positions simultaneously.

Foot Technique Step Sparring:

  The attacker will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their right foot.  The defender will step into a Parallel Ready Stance with their left foot.

  The attacker and defender will step into their ready positions simultaneously.

  The attacker will step back into L-Stance executing a middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and ki-ap to signal that they are ready to begin attack.

  The defender will step back into L-Stance executing middle Guarding Block with the Outer Forearm and will not ki-ap.

Stepping:

Three-Step Sparring:

  If the attacker uses Walking Stances and the defender uses Walking Stances, then the attacker will step to the outside of the defender’s lead foot, then to the inside, and then to the outside.

  If the attacker uses L-Stances and the defender uses L-Stances, then the attacker will step to the inside of the defender’s lead foot, then to the outside, and then to the inside. 

  If the attacker uses Walking Stances and the defender uses L-Stances, then the attacker will step to the outside of the defender’s lead foot all three times.

  If the attacker uses L-Stances and the defender uses Walking Stances, then the attacker will step to the inside of defender’s lead foot all three times.

  The attacker must step to the same spot from which they measured for their first attack.

 

Attacks:

All Step Sparring:

   For simplicity "…step forward into…" and "…step backward into…" have been used to describe the motion of attacks and defenses, however for higher rank Step-Sparring routines jumping techniques, dodging techniques, skipping techniques, and sliding techniques are also permitted. 

Three-Step Sparring:

   The three attacks will be the same hand technique or foot technique and will be from the same stance.

Two-Step Sparring:

   The two attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

One-Step Sparring:

   The attacks for each routine will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques.

Semi-Free Step Sparring:

   The attacker’s attack will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques.

Model Sparring:

   The attacks for each routine will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques.

Pre-Arranged Step Sparring:

   The attacks for each routine will alternate between hand techniques and foot techniques. 

Foot Technique Step Sparring:

   All attacks will be foot techniques.

 

Counter Attacks:

All Step Sparring:

   If the last counter attack is a foot technique, then the defender will step forward into an L-Stance with the kicking leg before continuing on to the ready position.

 Three-Step Sparring:

   Alone and Beginning: One counter-attack will be used.

   Intermediate: Two counterattacks will be used.  The counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

   Advanced: Three counter-attacks will be used.  The first two counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique and the third counter-attack maybe either a hand technique or a foot technique.

Two Step-Sparring:

  Double or consecutive foot techniques are allowed, and the defender may use a defensive foot technique and counter-attack with an offensive foot technique. 

   Beginning: One counter-attack will be used.

   Intermediate: Two counter-attacks will be used.  The counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

   Two-Way Two-Step: Three counter-attacks will be used.  These counter-attacks may consist of mixture of both hand and foot attack combinations. (i.e., hand-foot-hand, foot-hand-foot, hand-foot-foot, foot-foot-hand, or hand-hand-foot, etc.)

One-Step Sparring:

  Double, triple or consecutive foot techniques are allowed and the defender may use a defensive foot technique and counter-attack with an offensive foot technique.

   Beginning: One counter-attack will be used.

   Intermediate: Two counter-attacks will be used.  The counter-attacks will be a hand technique and then a foot technique or a foot technique and then a hand technique.

   Advanced: Multiple counterattacks are to be used, but the number of counter-attacks should not be excessive.  The counter-attacks may consist of any combination, consecutive, or multiple hand techniques and foot techniques however Advanced One-Step Sparring is designed for the defender to demonstrate their kicking abilities, so no more than one hand technique should be used in each routine.

Semi-Free Step Sparring:

  The defender will counter-attack with the same type of technique that the initial attacker used last.  (i.e.  A foot technique for a foot technique, a hand technique for a hand technique, a flying technique for a flying technique, a skipping technique for a skipping technique, a sliding technique for a sliding technique, etc.)

Model Step-Sparring:

  Multiple counter-attacks are to be used, but the number of counter-attacks should not be excessive.  The counter-attacks may consist of any combination, consecutive, or multiple hand techniques and foot techniques however Model Sparring is designed for the student to demonstrate their kicking ability with high target kicking, posed kicking, and difficult combination and consecutive kicking.  An ideal counter-attack for Model Sparring would be one hand technique and up to three foot techniques. No jumping, flying or mid-air kicks are allowed.

Pre-Arranged Step-Sparring:

  Multiple counter-attacks may be used however the final ideal counter-attack for a Pre-Arranged Free-Sparring routine would be one powerful hand technique or foot technique.

Foot Technique Step Sparring:

  Multiple counter-attacks may be used however an ideal counter-attack for a Foot Technique Sparring routine would be one powerful hand technique or foot technique.

 

Dodging Techniques:

  Dodging allows the attacker to use any technique freely at the proper distance, and increases the opportunity of targets.  The added advantage of this technique is not only to avoid collision at a close distance, but to allow a surprise attack while flying away from the opponent.  With technique alone, Taekwon-Do can be clearly differentiated from any other existing martial art.

 

Flying Multiple Techniques:

  A student of Taekwon-Do is encouraged to use as many multiple techniques as possible, such as; consecutive, combination or double kicks, punches or strikes.  These types of techniques are principally used while flying - though occasionally on the ground.